How much does a teacher really earn?

WagesThis post follows on from my most popular blog post to date ‘How much does an NQT earn?’ Written just over two years ago, it has had over 18,000 views and it it always looked at daily, even now.

So I’ve decided to do the same post but with an actual wage slip of when I was in the swing of teaching. As with the last post, you have to bare a few things in mind: This wage slip is from two years ago. It was when I was teaching in a mainstream school. I have quite a large student loan and although the dedication looks small on this wage slip, I get over double deducted now and I am outside of London. Also don’t forget that us teachers have had our oh so generous 1% pay increase each year for the past two years.

So here is a complete breakdown from my actual wage slip and gives you an insight into what a teacher earns. I am currently suffering from baby brain so I can’t quite remember what M scale this was from, but I think I had been teaching around 4 years.

Total Pay & Allowances:    £2,161.00

DEDUCTIONS

Employee NIC:     £155.23

Tax Paid:     £302.00

Pension:      £159.91

Student Loan:     £64.00

Total Deductions:    £681.14

TAKE HOME PAY: £1,479.86

As you can see, a lot of your wage you never actually get to ‘feel’. A lot is deducted before it even hits your bank account. However, I may be in the minority but I am actually pleased with my wage. Yes, I definitely think teachers deserve more and when you break down the hourly rate, most teachers are on less than minimum wage. But, now two years on, I am earning more than the figure above (surprisingly, not that much as I get taxed a lot more now and have larger student loan deductions and pension contributions) and I am earning a good wage. A wage that allows me to pay my mortgage, go on holiday, indulge my shoe and clothing shopping habit and generally enjoy myself.

You have to remember that you will start off on quite a basic wage but it soon creeps up and along the way you may be lucky enough to add on a TLR payment, SEN points of get appointed as a member of SLT. Sometimes you need to weigh up the stress/ workload balance though. I was offered a behaviour TLR at the PRU where I work. As is obvious, behaviour isn’t normally a strong point for referral units and the TLR was worth £1,300. The extra workload and pressure just wasn’t worth it for me at this time in my life so I declined. But it just shows that there are ways of boosting your income in education.

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